🚗Uber's poor business practices continue | 🛡️ Unroll.me realises what transparency means | 🕵️ What does Facebook know about you?

This week the focus is entirely on marketing, data and privacy. Uber plays fast and loose with our da
🚗Uber's poor business practices continue | 🛡️ Unroll.me realises what transparency means | 🕵️ What does Facebook know about you?
By Connected Paths (Riaz Kanani) • Issue #15 • View online
This week the focus is entirely on marketing, data and privacy. Uber plays fast and loose with our data, whilst Unroll.me realises grey text on a grey background is not a definition of transparency. Microsoft takes its first steps following its LinkedIn acquisition and there is an easy way to see what Facebook knows about you. First up though is how difficult it is to change our minds.

Why facts don't change our minds
“Thanks again for coming—I usually find these office parties rather awkward.”
“Thanks again for coming—I usually find these office parties rather awkward.”
Understanding what people think of your brand and changing it is a difficult thing that often takes a big unexpected event or takes time. It will be the same with our perceptions of the various political parties (and their leaders) in this election campaign. “Once formed, impressions are remarkably perseverant” found multiple research studies from Stanford in the 70s. The New Yorker looks at more recent studies, how strong feelings about issues do not emerge from deep understanding and its impact on the world we live in today. An excellent read. Click here.
.. you did what with my data?
There is nothing like finding out a company is playing fast and loose with your privacy to get the internet’s knickers in a twist. Uber it turns out has been doing exactly that - so cue furore. In an excellent piece by the New York Times on Uber (OK - they did go a little over the top with the sensationalism), they highlighted that Uber had been blocking Apple engineers from knowing that they were continuing to track devices even after the app was deleted. That clearly break’s Apple’s rules. Uber of course played it down and say it was only tracking the device anonymously to stop fraud and it is all fixed now but of course they knew they were breaking Apple’s terms and surprisingly even after Apple knew, they didn’t pull them from the App Store. 
Another fall out from the New York Times piece was Unroll.me, which manages your subscription to marketing email messages and requires access to your inbox. Unroll.me was looking at the receipts in your inbox from Lyft (and others of course), and then selling that data anonymously to Uber, allowing them to get a better understanding of demand for Lyft’s services. Deals like that happen all the time, but Unroll.me were not transparent about that. Gizmodo found it in the terms and conditions in grey text on a light grey background. Oops. Their business model is unlikely to change, but Jan Dawson has a look at the business model Unroll.me uses and potential others available to it.
Microsoft/LinkedIn start to play together
Credit: Microsoft
Credit: Microsoft
Microsoft bought LinkedIn for a whopping $26.2bn last year and as predicted the first steps for the two to work together are through their CRM platform, Dynamics. Microsoft’s blog post suggests it will allow sales people to use their networks on LinkedIn, send InMail and deliver automated messaging. All very boring and apart from the direct InMail integration not more than other CRM platforms are already doing. This does highlight that at least part of Microsoft’s strategy for LinkedIn is as a data platform though and if it is going to work, LinkedIn (Microsoft) are going to need to be transparent with its users about how their data is being used. 
I just wish they would tackle the digital business card - they are by far the best positioned to deliver on it and would serve to increase using within business - assuming privacy concerns are dealt with of course.
What does Facebook know about you?
Facebook has always struggled with its complex privacy settings and we all know it has a huge amount of information on us. One of the ways Facebook makes money is by allowing advertisers to put messages in front of people they think would be receptive to them (not always of course 😉) To do that though, Facebook needs to guess things about you. You can see what it thinks of you here or you can read more on this here. Mine was not very accurate - I was listed as both a late adopter of technology and an early adopter of technology.
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Connected Paths (Riaz Kanani)
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